Making REPL driven development easy with leiningen

TL;DR: Leiningen provides facilities that make using a REPL driven workflow a breeze. You should consider using them on your projects for a more pleasant development experience. Make your system reloadable First of all the application should be reloadable, that means restartable in the REPL without restarting the entire process. If the app can shutdown and start quickly, this makes development way faster, less error prone and more pleasing experience. [Read More]

Clone all those gitlab repositories

If you change work environments once in a while you know that there is one thing that you are doing quite a lot of when starting off: Cloning quite a lot of repositories. Microservices, git and infrastructure as code among other things have let to a big number of repositories in almost all organizations. As I was doing that the last time it got really tedious. Mainly because I wanted to search the whole code base and that did not work with the local gitlab instance. [Read More]
gitlab  git  bash 

Thinkpad Ultra Dock Annoyances

Just a few days ago I finally fixed an annoyance with my Thinkpad T460p and the Ultra Dock: Removing the laptop from the Dock results in it going into hibernation. Then after opening the lid it does not switch the built in screen back on. This turns out to be easy to fix. Undocking and docking leads to a lot of events which can be observed by a simple sudo acpi_listen The event that seems to be the most promising is used as a trigger to correct the display settings. [Read More]

Releasing clojure libs

Releasing libraries is a tedious but important task.There is lots to do and lots to screw up: Tagging the release state Making a clean build Signing the artifacts Pushing them to some repository Bumping the version to the next snapshot iteration And so on and so forth… Having a dark past in the java world I looked for something like the maven release plugin for leiningen, which automates the whole process quite nicely. [Read More]

Create bugs with overtone

These days I stumbled upon some code committed by a very competent but sadly no longer present colleague and was baffled to see this: catch (Throwable t (log/error t "horrible things happend)) This left me puzzled and after looking for clues why this had been done (and not finding any) I decided to remove this exception dodger and move on. Turns out I created a bug. Why? Because this code was called in a job scheduler from the very popular overtone/at-at library. [Read More]